Many people choose to form businesses in Nevada. These are the advantages, according to the Nevada Secretary of State .

We know: All About Nevada Corporations

Why Incorporate in Nevada?

  • No Corporate Income Tax
  • No Taxes on Corporate Shares
  • No Franchise Tax
  • No Personal Income Tax
  • No IRS Information Sharing Agreement
  • Nominal Annual Fees
  • Minimal Reporting and Disclosure Requirements
  • Stockholders are not Public Record

Additional Advantages

  • Stockholders, directors and officers need not live or hold meetings in Nevada, or even be U.S. Citizens.
  • Directors need not be Stockholders
  • Officers and directors of a Nevada corporation can be protected from personal liability for lawful acts of the corporation.
  • Nevada corporations may purchase, hold, sell or transfer shares of its own stock.
  • Nevada corporations may issue stock for capital, services, personal property or real estate, including leases and options. The directors may determine the value of any of these transactions, and their decision is final.

Here's a summary of the differences between corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships from the Small Business Administration


A corporation, chartered by the state in which it is headquartered, is considered by law to be a unique entity, separate and apart from those who own it. A corporation can be taxed; it can be sued; it can enter into contractual agreements. The owners of a corporation are its shareholders. The shareholders elect a board of directors to oversee the major policies and decisions. The corporation has a life of its own and does not dissolve when ownership changes.


In a Partnership, two or more people share ownership of a single business. Like proprietorships, the law does not distinguish between the business and its owners. The Partners should have a legal agreement that sets forth how decisions will be made, profits will be shared, disputes will be resolved, how future partners will be admitted to the partnership, how partners can be bought out, or what steps will be taken to dissolve the partnership when needed;. Yes, its hard to think about a "break-up" when the business is just getting started, but many partnerships split up at crisis times and unless there is a defined process, there will be even greater problems. They also must decide up front how much time and capital each will contribute, etc.

Types of Partnerships that should be considered:

  1. General Partnership
    Partners divide responsibility for management and liability, as well as the shares of profit or loss according to their internal agreement. Equal shares are assumed unless there is a written agreement that states differently.
  2. Limited Partnership and Partnership with limited liability
    "Limited" means that most of the partners have limited liability (to the extent of their investment) as well as limited input regarding management decisions, which generally encourages investors for short term projects, or for investing in capital assets. This form of ownership is not often used for operating retail or service businesses. Forming a limited partnership is more complex and formal than that of a general partnership.
  3. Joint Venture
    Acts like a general partnership, but is clearly for a limited period of time or a single project. If the partners in a joint venture repeat the activity, they will be recognized as an ongoing partnership and will have to file as such, and distribute accumulated partnership assets upon dissolution of the entity.


The vast majority of small businesses start out as sole proprietorships. These firms are owned by one person, usually the individual who has day-to-day responsibility for running the business. Sole proprietors own all the assets of the business and the profits generated by it. They also assume complete responsibility for any of its liabilities or debts. In the eyes of the law and the public, you are one in the same with the business.


The LLC is a relatively new type of hybrid business structure that is now permissible in most states. It is designed to provide the limited liability features of a corporation and the tax efficiencies and operational flexibility of a partnership. Formation is more complex and formal than that of a general partnership. The owners are members, and the duration of the LLC is usually determined when the organization papers are filed. The time limit can be continued if desired by a vote of the members at the time of expiration. LLCs must not have more than two of the four characteristics that define corporations: Limited liability to the extent of assets; continuity of life; centralization of management; and free transferability of ownership interests.

Privacy Policy | Terms of Use ©

Sponsored by